Aberfeldy and Kenmore

Aberfeldy is in the Tay Valley, its name ‘Aber’ means the confluence of two rivers, in this case the River Tay and the Moness. General Wade built a bridge over the Tay at Aberfeldy in 1733, it is called Wade’s Bridge to this day, it was designed by William Adam the father of the more famous Robert Adam, the Scottish neoclassical architect, interior designer and furniture designer.

Aberfeldy is at the junction of two roads, A827 which comes from the East connecting Pitlochry and Dunkeld to the town and passes
on to Loch Tay and Kenmore. The other road is the A826 which comes from the south via
Crieff and Perth.

In addition to Wades Bridge the town is best known for the Black Watch Memorial, the Black Watch regiment, six companies of trustworthy Highlanders, were first assembled on the outskirts of Aberfeldy in 1725. There is also the Birks of Aberfeldy made famous by Rabbie (Robert) Burns in 1787, by his poem of the same name. Today, as in Rabbie Burns’s day, it is a delightful walk along the Moness burn to its high waterfall and back to Aberfeldy.

There is a monthly farmers market in the Square in the centre of Aberfeldy which is well worth going to.